Thursday, January 19, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Nat Dickinson

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Nat's painting, "Through the Trees" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Nat's DPW Gallery:

​My love of painting landscapes was instilled by my grandfather, an enthusiastic amateur painter. As a child, I would paint with my grandfather on the back porch studio of his summer house in Maine overlooking the Penobscot Bay. Maine remains a key subject of my work, along with my home in Asheville, North Carolina.

My paintings explore those mindful moments when we stop to see the extraordinary transformations of very familiar surroundings. In my daily walks the changes in light, atmosphere, perspective, and color can make the most ordinary scenes become captivating.

My work is shown in juried shows and galleries in Washington, D.C, North Carolina, and Maine. You can follow my daily painting on Instagram. (click to view bio)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My grandfather was an enthusiastic amateur painter.  When I was small, he would encourage me to paint with him on the back porch of his cottage on the Penobscot Bay in Maine.  I still go and paint at that cottage all these decades later.  Every summer my dozens of cousins will show me yet another of my grandfather's paintings they've proudly kept for years, and remind me of how pleased he'd be that I'm painting.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I completed my graduate degree in art, but after some time working in a printmaking shop, I switched to a long career away from creative pursuits. I'd always sculpted or painted throughout that time, and took the first opportunity to return to painting. I've known a lot of artists who struggled with their work when they struggled financially, and I've often wondered whether I would have been a better artist or not if I had persisted.

Through the Trees
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Nat's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

In college and grad school, we all recapitulated the entire history of modern art over the course of seven years-- a little impressionism, cubism, abstract expressionism, and conceptual art all figured in there.  I was working with wood sculpture when living in New Mexico and some time after, but have focused mostly on landscape painting over the last twenty years-- like my grandfather.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

90% of my work today is landscape, seascape, or cityscape with acrylic paints.  My sculpture skills and tools are now used for framing and occasional furniture making.

Fairview Barn
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I've never been a technical painter and am not really drawn to exotic media or techniques-- which is somewhat ironic since I was a printmaker in school, and that is all techniques.  At this time, I am focused on working more authoritatively and better expressing light and color.

Who or what inspires you most?

David Hockney does the most brilliant unpretentious documentaries on his creative process.  The recent "A Bigger Picture" and older one on his photo collages have always excited me.  There is not much convergence in our work, but I love to hear him talk.

Mill Pond Passage
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I don't really see a benefit in procrastinating or waiting for inspiration. Paint some every day, even if you are likely to end up painting over it.  The big ideas come from a lot of little observations from working through the difficult times.  Otherwise procrastination just feeds itself.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Like my dog, I'm habit driven and am uncomfortable when not following my routine.  Make art your habit, and this question doesn't really come up.  I can understand that people have busy schedules that can interfere, but you have to honestly evaluate whether that is what is preventing you from making art.

Rescue Dog Boomer
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I walk for two or three hours a day with my dog, and try to scout for new ideas and subjects while doing so.  I plan out ten or fifteen paintings ahead of time, and so I get to pick out the one that most excites me.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I recently attended an artist's colony for two weeks, and that was a great opportunity to live with other artists in a new place and context.  I worked incredibly hard and had a great time.  The challenge is to take the excitement of that experience and carry it back to the routine of the studio.

West on Patton
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

How to manage being a selling artist.  It's very challenging maintaining your self-esteem and vision when faced with market pressures, and it is a constant effort trying to find the right situation and audience for your artwork.

What makes you happiest about your art?

The continuous improvement I see.  I think a lot about how my experience of making a series of paintings is so different from the viewer's experience of seeing a single finished work.  The paintings I love best are the ones that seem to flow from the brush, or, conversely, the ones that I had to work hardest to pull together.  That's why the paintings I see are so different from the ones my audience sees.

Thanks, Nat!

© 2017 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 12, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Peter Lentini

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Peter's painting, "Attentive" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Peter's DPW Gallery:

Children possess art as an intrinsic perspicacity which in most is diminished as they mature. Yet there are some who continue to hold the vision. When I attended the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, I majored in sculpture and even though I paint almost exclusively now, some of that sense of fullness and the drama of shadow and light of the solid object still persist in my work. Over the years, I have continued to manipulate materials, building furniture, objects such as spinning wheels, and traditional wooden boats, some photos of which appear on this site at the end of my gallery. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I have been drawing since I could hold a pencil, painting since first grade and enjoyed visiting art museums from an early age as well. I knew not to touch, well paintings at least, sculpture was another issue.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

As for stops and starts, of course. When I attended college in fine arts, I majored in sculpture so I have always been engaged in making: wooden boats, working with wood, carving, spinning wheels, furniture, cabinetry, various forms of design, tile work and carpentry always with some painting interspersed. Though I have made a point to paint regularly and have been doing so for some ten years now.

Attentive
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Peter's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have painted more in watercolor, transparent, white paper, but over the last several years have been enjoying working more with oils, usually on stretched cotton canvas but also on wood panels which I make. I use only three colors, primaries, a red, a blue and a yellow, and with oil of course a white. Nothing falls away, I learn from each and every venture, every aspect and approach; it is all a way of seeing regardless of details.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I am easily satisfied and absorbed so I am rarely aware of any conscious change or attempt to change. I do not seek excitement or novelty, but I do enjoy depth and intimacy with the medium beyond mere thinking.

Mona and Lisa
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

There might not be inspiration per se, but I enjoy the work of other artists if I find an emotional connection or I admire the manner in which they conceive composition or value relations sometimes with all aspects present.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I do not procrastinate, though I do not paint every day either but I usually have an idea of what I want to paint next and start easily enough at the right time, without anguish or waiting for a muse.


Vapor Arch
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

As for making time for art, that is directly related to wanting to make art. I look forward to and enjoy painting so I paint.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Ideas for painting, there are always far too many, but I will narrow the field, mix it up, get close and something will clarify itself as requiring my attention. Of course, there has to be incentive so the idea must be evocative. At least for representational art, many beautiful subjects or situations cannot be rendered successfully with painting. Words can form beautiful images, but these often will not migrate onto the canvas.

Duo et al
(click to view

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I would never give a thought to "keeping it fresh", however, paint what you enjoy and never look back, set no goals, remain unfocused. Build a wall, make some stairs, prune a tree. Art is not suited for tedious rules or regulations. As Gandalf might have said, “A wizard is never late, but always arrives when he chooses.” There is never too much of this or too little of that. The painting simply needs to work and above all the result must be pleasing or more if possible. Never allow anyone to define you, ever.

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I do not think in terms of "learning", nonetheless, it is always about seeing and making, never conscious, never imagining what I am doing is art, because it may not be and I am better off not knowing. However, always attempt to make better art, to see more deeply, to enjoy more obliviously.


Duet at First Light
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

Specifically, the time in an oil painting when the white is gone, (not the same for watercolor) then it begins to manifest itself, then every move is of consequence, that is a pleasure, absorbed and painting. The joy of art is the fulfillment of making something, having something appear that was once only gessoed white canvas, something from nothing even if that is only an illusion. It is only an illusion anyway no matter what we may pretend to the contrary. So simply, something from nothing, a gift, a surprise.

Thanks, Peter!

© 2017 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 5, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Vishalandra Dakur

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Vishalandra's painting, "Museum Visitor 1" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Vishalandra's DPW Gallery:

Born and raised in Hyderabad area, Vishal dreamed of attending the Fine Art College, Hyderabad, but instead pursued an Engineering Degree (B.E. Mechanical) at the Osmania University to satisfy his parents insistence on a more practical path to earning a living.

Vishal was born an artist. Drawing was his passion and he practiced daily. Recognition for Vishal's efforts came early. In 1962, at the age of twelve, A.P. Govt invited him to paint and present the portrait painting of Sri S. Radhakrishnan, President of India at the public gathering at Nizam College grounds. The President appreciated his art and garlanded him.

In the year 1964, (at the age fourteen) Press Club of Hyderabad invited him to conduct 1st Solo Exhibition of his paintings, inaugurated by then Cultural Minister of A.P. Govt, Sri M.R.Appa Rao.
Vishal’s early paintings were studies in Realism. Later, he concentrated on the painting style of impasto combining Indian painting strokes and Western colors. Vishal refined his paintings to capture the energy and movement in the topic of his personal history and life's rich memories. One outstanding aspect of Vishal’s art is his unique ability to communicate dynamic movement. In order to have lines and strokes contain aesthetic meaning, first he'll use abstract strokes with vivid rhythms to describe the most complicated human feeling and body language. In the details, the lines and planes are very modern looking, with a realistic feeling. Vishal’s ability to capture the essence of his subject matter while allowing the viewer to participate is sublime.

He received in 2009, National Award in the117th All India Annual Art  Exhibition, conducted by The Bombay Art Society at Jahangir Art Gallery.
In the years 2008 and in 2009, he received Finalist Awards twice from ARC Salon International, New Jersey, USA.
In the year 2009, he was selected to Signature Membership in ISAP (International Society of Acrylic Painters), CA, USA.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My mother recognized my talent at the age of seven or so when I spoiled all the white washed outer walls of my house with the charcoal sketches of portraits of then movie heroes. Then she purchased drawing materials and encouraged me to practice. So my self taught journey started.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I never stopped but slowed during my studies.

Museum Visitor 1
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Vishalandra's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I practiced many paintings in watercolor in my childhood, now I've switched to oils and acrylics. Learning and practicing in watercolors makes it easy to paint in oils, is my thinking. I think I have painted many in every genre.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Watercolor is the medium I left and presently I am doing many oil paintings, and acrylics also.

New York in Night 7
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I am unable to sell Native American art, which is the genre I love to paint most; I have painted some thirty of my best paintings in this genre in oil but they are not sold. I have done more figurative paintings and landscapes and sold many.

Who or what inspires you most?

Howard Terpning, I have learnt and improved my talent a lot from his painting style. Whenever I am free I study his paintings, usually every day.

Untitled
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I am always busy drawing or painting something, never idle.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Most of the paintings are done in the night, which is the time I prefer for detailed work. I don’t like the noise of the streets.

New York in Night 4
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

The toughest subject for me is getting to best ideas for starting a painting. I get lot of ideas but never settle on one to paint, but once it's selected in my mind, painting starts and completes.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I love to handle many subjects in my style so there is no creative burnout in my life.

Museum Visitor 7
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Last year's paintings look bad to me, and this year's paintings may look bad to me next year, so I've learned I am not perfect even after ten years. Practice, practice….

What makes you happiest about your art?

I am happy because my mind, my eyes, and my hands are blessed by God such that they create a painting, and I give that to my buyers who praise me everyday.

Thanks, Vishalandra!

© 2017 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 29, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jean Delaney

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Jean's painting, "In the Clouds" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jean's DPW Gallery:

Jean lives and paints in Qualicum Beach, B.C. on beautiful Vancouver island.

I am inspired by many different subjects, though my favourites right now are animals and florals. My path through life has been dotted with everything creative from fashion design to rug hooking. For 15 years I had a rug hooking design business but always found time to paint, then in 2013 I committed to painting full time. Being mostly self taught has come with it's challenges but it also has allowed me to learn from my mistakes and my victories. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I am definitely what you would call a late bloomer at painting. I was heavily into fibre arts for twenty-five years, and in between that I dabbled in painting. I started taking painting workshops about ten years ago and would periodically pull out my easel and experiment with what I had learned. Then in 2013, I read about daily painting. I started with a small blank canvas every day; what a wonderful concept. I purchased fifty 6x6 inch canvas panels and started painting. In the beginning I did a lot of wiping and sweating but with time I gained confidence. Now the more I paint, the more I want to paint.

Cow 146 In the Clouds
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jean's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I had many starts and stops but when I finally committed to painting on a regular basis things changed for me.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I am definitely most fond of painting with oils. For years I was afraid to even try them, but after much encouragement from a friend I took the plunge. I absolutely love everything about them, a perfect fit for my style of painting. As far a genre goes, I paint a variety of things but most days on my easel you will see an animal or a floral.

Hint of Spring
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

I watch artist videos like other people watch movies (I call this a healthy addiction). I also find staying curious keeps me inspired.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I am ok without painting for a couple of days. I would say I don’t have procrastination when it comes to picking up my paint brush. What does happen though is that I will start a painting, end up wiping it and walking away from my easel until the next day.

Little Miss Big
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I wake up at 6:00 every morning, head to the computer to answer emails and then grab my iPad, prop it up at the kitchen table and pull up the photo I am going to paint (which I have usually chosen the night before). I spend a good half hour just observing the photo while drinking my tea and knitting (morning routine). I then head to my easel, and yes, I do paint in my pyjamas everyday.

Simple Pleasures
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

We live in a very beautiful area with ocean and forest. I find that just walking my dog I get so many ideas for my paintings. I also paint many animal portraits so I take my camera everywhere I go and there always seems to be an opportunity to find a compelling subject. There is also a site I use sometimes that allows the use of their photos.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I feel very fortunate. I rarely feel burnout, I just feel excitement. After I finish one painting, I can’t wait to start the next.

Cow 148 Slurp
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

For years, I was learning from other artists. Now, I am at a point where I am also learning from myself. Spending so much time alone just putting your vision onto a canvas, you really get to know yourself.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I think because I paint most days, my work has become more rhythmic and in sync… it is a wonderful feeling. Also, I paint one day a week at a studio in town so I am fortunate enough to see people's reactions to my art… there is nothing better.

Thanks, Jean!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 22, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Dana Cooper

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Dana's painting, "Spring Roses" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Dana's DPW Gallery:

After retiring as a children's art teacher, award winning southern California painter Dana Cooper has taken her painting from a hobby to a more full time pursuit. Viewing the world around her now as a daily painter, she is grateful for the opportunity to see and paint the world through the eyes of an artist!

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

As a child, I enjoyed drawing and as an adult, I always found ways to express myself creatively. It wasn’t until my own children were in middle school that I seriously pursued painting instruction for myself. Even at that point, I thought it would only be a hobby. Once I started painting, however, I was bitten by the passion to create art and I have never looked back!

Spring Roses
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Dana's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Though I have experimented with watercolors, acrylics, gauche, charcoal and mixed media, traditional oil paint still is and probably always will be my favorite medium. Genres? Figures and portraiture are my first love but I can be inspired by most any and every subject, for me it’s always about the light.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Watercolors fell away and have never found their way back but I still enjoy playing with gauche, oil sticks, charcoal and mixed medias. I have never worked with pastels, but that medium may be next.

The Painter
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Abstract figurative is a genre that really appeals to me. Though I typically work on the small side, I have some larger, more abstracted figurative work in my studio that may or may not ever see the light of day, but the pursuit of something better keeps me working at it. I think play is important in art.

In the Moment
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

Other artists awe and inspire me and push me to try new things.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Making time for my art has never been an issue. At one point in my painting career, I did paint every day which really helped me learn to see and mix color as well as get into good painting habits. Today, staying organized and on top of my life’s responsibilities helps to ensure studio time.

Among the Crowd
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Inspiration for paintings comes from a variety of sources. Travels and photos from those travels have been a huge source for ideas over the years. I always work from some sort of reference photo or from life. One often informs the other.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Burnout has been an issue at times but I try to paint through it and/or try new mediums and genres. I also try to take workshops from artists whose work engages me to kickstart a new direction.

Her Green Hat
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I am learning that creating a painting is so much more than being able to copy a reference. I am learning that my paintings are more interesting when I start with an intention or an emotion.  I am learning that edges are important and that creating an interesting value pattern is important. I am learning that painting is what centers me in ways I keep discovering. And what is most exciting to me is that I keep learning!

What makes you happiest about your art?

The process is what I enjoy most about painting and the results are secondary but when both things are in sync, it’s nirvana! I’m happy when my art connects to others.

Thanks, Dana!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 15, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Chantel Barber

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Chantel's painting, "In Paris" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Chantel's DPW Gallery:

Chantel Lynn Barber resides in Bartlett, Tennessee. Her passion for art began flourishing at age twelve when she studied under various local San Diego artists. Chantel studied art while living in Rhode Island and Keflavik, Iceland. She remained active in local art communities. Chantel opened her own art business "Chantel's Originals" in 2006. Chantel has benefited from workshops and demonstrations with outstanding artists including Dawn Whitelaw and Michael Shane Neil. Chantel is the Tennessee State Ambassador for the Portrait Society of America and is also a member of the American Impressionist Society. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My earliest memories are of painting with children’s watercolor. When I was ten years old I was introduced to oil painting by a neighbor who was an artist. She gave me lessons once a week for the next three years.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Most definitely. In the early years I struggled with feeling that I was not good enough and at one point I packed my art supplies away for two years. I also had times where health issues and raising two boys caused me to put my art on hold.

In Paris
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Chantel's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have worked in oil, charcoal, graphite, acrylic, soft pastel, mixed media and clay. I have explored painting landscapes, animals, buildings, still life, botanicals, and portraiture.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Portraiture is definitely a genre that has stuck with me! I continue to enjoy plein air painting, along with creating botanical still lives. Without a doubt, acrylic is my favorite medium - closely followed by graphite and soft pastel. I just love working in these! I no longer work in oil.

Looking Up
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I continue to delve into the possibilities of the acrylic medium. I am drawn to it’s versatility. I want to develop techniques using acrylic to create plein air pieces on location.

Who or what inspires you most?

People inspire me! I was recently at the Grand Canyon and while everyone else was absorbed in the beautiful landscape, I was drawn to the variety of people all around. Every face was so interesting and unique. I cannot help but be captured by the human spirit and often find myself working out how to express this in paint.

Take Notice
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Cleaning! I clean and organize when I am avoiding the easel. I know a painting is not going well, or I am avoiding it, when I find I would rather clean a toilet than paint.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

A daily routine is key to my painting almost every day. When in the studio I control distractions. I love to listen to audio books while I paint and a good story will ensure my presence at the easel.

On Your Shoulders
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I am a keen observer of things around me. Often seeing a display in a store or watching people walking by inspires me. I am always on the lookout for props to be modeled, hats in particular. Once I have a hat, I look for a model who brings emotion to the piece.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid
burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I learned early on that continuing to work on a painting which has lost it’s freshness is a formula for burnout. If a painting is not working, or the idea has faded, it is recycled or tossed. During the painting process, a stroke that is not reading right is never left on the canvas. It is removed and a new stroke laid down. I am not afraid to wipe a painting down to it’s ghost and start over rather than continue with an over-worked piece. It is not a waste of time and supplies because I have learned valuable lessons about what worked and what didn’t.

Being Me
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I find I am more concerned with the overall effect of a painting rather than getting caught up in the details. I am intrigued by how important controlling values are to the success of a painting. Everyday brings new challenges in this area.

What makes you happiest about your art?

This is a tough one to answer. I love the finished pieces and the way others are blessed through my art. But the process of getting to the finished piece is truly where my happy place is. There is nothing quite like standing at the easel, brush in hand, watching a piece emerge. I am grateful that God has shared this talent with me.

Thanks, Chantel!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 8, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Mike Peterson

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Mike's painting, "Yellow Scarf" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Mike's DPW Gallery:

I grew up in northern Illinois where my interest in art took me to Chicago and the American Academy of Art. That was 1976 and at the time, my training focused on watercolor painting which I continued to pursue exclusively for about 15 years. Although I no longer do much watercolor painting, I appreciate its unique qualities and continue as a signature member of the Transparent Watercolor Society of America. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I attended art school in Chicago at the American Academy of Art a long, long time ago.  The routine was fairly structured, life drawing in the morning and a course on fundamentals, including painting technique, in the afternoon.  My introduction to painting really began my second year when I studied watercolor painting with Irving Shapiro.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

After art school, I moved from Illinois to Austin, Texas with the intention of becoming a full-time artist.  After about a year, the difficulties of making a living became apparent and I started a “temporary” day job.  It lasted thirty years.  Since retiring five years ago, I have been a full-time painter.  Finally!!

Yellow Scarf
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Mike's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I began my painting career as a watercolor painter and after about fifteen years decided to try something new.  I did not begin painting in oils immediately, but made the change gradually.  I started with acrylics, then water-soluble oils and after about two years took the final step.  These days, I paint exclusively in oils.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Oil stuck.  Charcoal stuck.  I haven’t painted a watercolor in about twenty-five years.

Street Scene
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I expect to be learning about oil painting for another twenty-five years.  The variety of effects: transparency, opaqueness, soft edges, hard edges, temperature changes, color contrasts, the list goes on.  I am confident that I will never completely figure it out.  But that’s the challenge.

Who or what inspires you most?

I am inspired by many artists, past and present.  John Singer Sargent and Nicolai Fechin are two of my favorites.

Lady with Green Dress
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I sometimes get stuck on a particular painting, but I don’t really procrastinate.  I start painting about 9 am and paint in my studio all day.  A couple times a week, I get together with a group of artists and paint from a model.  Painting from life and plein air has given a huge lift to my studio painting which for the most part is based on photos or studies.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Generally speaking, I think that if you enjoy doing something enough, you will find time to do it.  It may not always be as much time as you want, but even thirty minutes of sketching can be a satisfying experience.  It’s kind of like exercise, the hardest part is often getting started.

Boy at the Museum
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I take lots of pictures when I travel.  People, buildings, nature.  Many of those pictures never develop into paintings, but if I like something, I will usually do thumbnail sketches or value studies to start before beginning the painting.  With the basic values established, I am able to concentrate more on using color and playing with edges.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I am usually working on more than one painting at any given time.  If I lose interest or get stuck on a painting, I usually turn it to the wall and work on something else for a while.  I find that sometimes “not working on a painting” is more useful than mindless dabbing of paint on canvas.    

Girl with a Rose
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Currently, I am trying to focus on good design making better use of a few strong shapes with a variety of edges.

What makes you happiest about your art?

It doesn’t always make me happy, but it always fascinates me.  I start a painting with a plan, in charge, and invariably there comes a point when the painting takes on a life of its own.  At that point, the painting leads the way, but I am not always sure where we’re going.

Regardless, it’s never a boring ride!

Thanks, Mike!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 1, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Kaethe Bealer

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Kaethe's painting, "The Kayaker" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Kaethe's DPW Gallery:

My name is Kaethe, pronounced "Kathy". I have been A DPW member artist since 2011. I have been painting since the age of 16 and have been on a serious course to become a better painter for the last 13 years. I have had the pleasure of studying with numerous accomplished artists. Peggi Kroll Roberts, Tim Horn and Stanley Goldstein have been my consistent teachers. I have also tried to absorb the wisdom of the art community. My mediums are acrylic and oil. I love painting light and shadow and hope that I can take the ordinary and emphasize its beauty. Thank you for looking at my work! (click to view gallery)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I loved art since I was able to pick up a crayon. When I was sixteen, growing up in Hawaii, my Mom signed me up for an adult painting class with a local artist, the late Joe Dawson.  We had fun painting his formula waterfalls, lava flows, beaches and palm trees. To my chagrin, my mom still has those paintings hung up on her walls.  (Please Mom, if you are reading this…)

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I didn’t do much art during my college years, especially during graduate school. I have a Masters in Social Work. I have always taken some kind of art class and was a “Sunday painter” until 2002. I am not sure what happened at that time but my light switch went on. I was excited about painting and wanted to get better at it. I became obsessed and the obsession is even more intense today.

The Kayaker
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Kaethe's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have used oils, acrylics, water based oils, pastels, watercolors, collage and silk screening. I think I have painted almost every genre. I get bored painting the same thing.

Which ones have stuck and which ones have fallen away?

I paint with Golden Open acrylics and oil paints. I don’t really use anything else. My subject matter remains varied; cats, dogs, figures, interiors, flowers, cityscapes, seascapes, etc.

The Art Class
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I hate to say it but I don’t have any interest in other mediums. Is that a bad thing? I just want to be a better painter. If I had to pick something that kind of falls into the category of exploration, it would be changing up the sizes of paintings and the formats. I have been doing squares and mostly small works. I would like to do larger works. I am going to be working on a 24x42 in the near future which I am pretty excited about.

Who or what inspires you?

I live on a boat and everywhere I look, I see a painting. I see paintings when I go for walks with my dog and when I am driving down the street. (I only take photos at the stoplights!) I get inspired seeing other artists’ work. I am hooked on Instagram for that reason alone! I get inspired because of the encouragement I have received from other artists. I also get inspired by listening to art podcasts such as Savvy Painter, Artists Helping Artists, PleinAir, and the Jealous Curator.

Attentive
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I once heard that procrastination often appears when you are trying to be perfect. I suppose when I am trying to find ways to not paint, it's spending time online. When I am ready to get over myself, I can start my work and not think about things too hard.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Even though I don’t have a lot of space, I do leave my table top easel set up with my palette box. I often paint in the mornings before going to my day job. This is especially true when I have deadlines. Weekends are usually reserved for painting. I try to paint 'til the evenings when I want to spend time with my husband.

The Commuters
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your painting?

I am constantly observing, taking photos, playing with compositions. I use photo editing tools to help me arrive at an idea. I have thousands of photos that I periodically look through. I look until something excites me.

How do you keep art fresh ? What techniques have helped you avoid burn out and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I give myself permission to take breaks. I think they are purposeful. I need to pace myself and not feel like a painting machine.  I use my breaks to ponder new ideas, look at other art or just do something entirely different away from art, like an art vacation.

The Flower Table
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?


I think I am learning how to talk about my work. I have been such a visual person. In my work as a social worker, I am focused on listening to others. My brain is not wired to elaborate and especially not to elaborate about me or my work. Opportunities such as this interview have been presenting themselves to me lately.  I recently did a demo for the Tracy Art League (thanks Vince!) and have a talk scheduled for my “30 Paintings in 30 Days” at the Harrington Gallery in Pleasanton, CA. I think there is something in the universe that’s telling me to develop the language around my art.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When someone tells me they have a connection with one of my paintings. That a painting spoke to them in some way and perhaps provided them with a smile. That makes me happy!

Thanks, Kaethe!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 24, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Shannon Bauer

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Shannon's painting, "Don't Mind If It Rains" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Shannon's DPW Gallery:

My name is Shannon Bauer. I was born in Michigan and now live right outside of Cincinnati, OH. I've always had an interest in art and loved to draw and paint as a child. I took my first formal painting class when I was in college as an art major with a graphic design concentration. I've kept at it ever since, but now find myself most often painting with acrylics. I appreciate the quick-drying time, as a lot of my paintings have layers and layers underneath until the painting comes to a place I am happy with. Painting seems to be the most effective way for me to clear my thoughts. And now I just can't seem to stop!

Please feel free to follow me on Instagram @sbauerart. Thank you! (click to view gallery)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I was always interested in art as a child. I transitioned into painting during my college years as an art major with a graphic design concentration. Studio courses for drawing and painting were my favorite and gave me the opportunity to discover a true passion.

Don't Mind If It Rains
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Shannon's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I have had several periods of time where my work seems to come to a standstill.  Even though I enjoyed painting in college, I didn't make it a priority in my life until years later.  Now I try to paint at least a couple times a week, and the quality of the work that's produced on those days seems to greatly impact how eager I am to try another painting. I often have times of frustration, but I just push on!

Olive No. 13
(click to view)

Describe your journey through mediums and genres.

I've experimented with Oils, Acrylics, Pencil, and Pastel. Landscapes have always been my favorite to paint, but I try to branch out here and there, painting animals and still life subjects. I've been painting solely with acrylics for a few years now.  In the beginning, the drying time required quite an adjustment, but now I feel it helps me to paint faster and fuss less (on a good day).

Because it's been years since I've painted seriously with oils, I keep wanting to give it another try just to see what unexpected discoveries lie on that path! I'd also like to try to approach more cityscapes and larger projects.

Who or what inspires you most?

I'm inspired by vast spaces of clouds, hills, oceans, and all nature really.  When I feel that I need an extra boost of inspiration I like to look up the work of Stuart Shills, Jon Redmond, Eric Aho, Mark Bohne, Oliver Akers Douglas, Liza Hurst... and the list keeps growing.

First Things
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Playing scrabble on my phone against my husband, checking out social media, and sometimes cleaning.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I always have a space in the weekend when my family knows I will be busy painting for a couple hours.  Sometimes at night I have enough energy to sketch out the bones of a painting and that gives me a little momentum for the next day if the baby decides to nap!

Sydney
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

A lot of my landscapes come from photos I snap on my phone when my husband is driving and I'm staring out the car window.  I do take artistic liberties... Sometimes the most beautiful cloud formation is hanging over an unappealing parking lot.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I am no master of this, but I can say when I start to feel burnout I usually switch to another subject.  If I haven't painted a landscape I'm happy with for awhile, I'll start taking pictures of my cat or buildings and go from there.

Later That Year
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I always wanted to be able to paint loosely and somehow still have every stroke look intentional and flawless.  That approach hasn't worked out for me. Right now I feel I am learning to embrace imperfection. When my hand becomes tight and too controlling I am usually not very happy with the product. In contrast, sometimes the imperfections are the most interesting parts.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I get in the zone and I'm listing to my music, I can forget about absolutely anything that was bothering me prior to painting. It's a nice escape that helps me feel more balanced as a person.  As an introvert, my art helps me to connect to people that I may not otherwise be able to connect to, and that always makes me feel good.

Thanks, Shannon!

© 2016 Sophie Marine